Readers ask: What Does Plato Say About Oratory?

By having Socrates point out the inconsistencies between Gorgias’s views of the practice and the goal of oratory, Plato argues that oratory, as practiced in his day, doesn’t truly benefit society. Both Socrates and Gorgias agree that the goal of oratory is to persuade listeners about what is just and unjust.
By having Socrates point out the inconsistencies between Gorgias’s views of the practice and the goal of oratory, Plato argues that oratory, as practiced in his day,doesn’t truly benefit society. Both Socrates and Gorgias agree that the goal of oratory is to persuade listeners about what is just and unjust.

How does Socrates define oratory?

Socrates replies that oratory is a knack that produces “a kind of gratification and pleasure” (463). This notion of “knack” may be contrasted with an “art” in that the former fails to possess the value rationality possessed by the latter; an art offers more than merely “what works” – it reflects what is ideal.

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What is Plato’s view of rhetoric in Gorgias?

In the dialogue Gorgias, Plato (through his mentor Socrates) expresses his contempt for sophistical rhetoric; all rhetoric is “a phantom of a branch of statesmanship (463d) …a kind of flattery …that is contemptible,” because its aim is simply pleasure rather than the welfare of the public.

What is meant by Socrates claim that oratory is a form of flattery?

In the course of pressing Gorgias for a definition of his craft, i.e., oratory, Socrates distinguishes between two types of persuasion. Oratory is a part of flattery in that it guesses what is pleasant as opposed to what is best.

What Plato thinks about rhetoric?

In Georgias, for example, Plato argued that because rhetoric does not require a unique body of knowledge it is a false rather than true art. While Plato condemned the art of rhetoric, his student, Aristotle (384-322 BCE) believed in the possibility of rhetoric as a means of creating community.

What does Socrates argue in Gorgias?

On the one hand, Socrates argues, those who rule others often must perform actions they do not will in order to benefit the state of which they are in charge. This treatment of power becomes all the more significant in light of the events surrounding Socrates’s actual trial and death.

What is Socrates argument in Gorgias?

Socrates says that he is one of those people who is actually happy to be refuted if he is wrong. He says that he would rather be refuted than to refute someone else because it is better to be delivered from harm oneself than to deliver someone else from harm.

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Who was Plato and what form of inquiry did he advocate How do we see evidence of Plato in modern rhetoric?

Who was Plato, and what form of inquiry did he advocate? Plato preferred the philosophical method of formal inquiry known as dialectic and he opposed rhetoric to dialectic.

Is Plato a sophist?

Plato, like his Socrates, differentiates the philosopher from the sophist primarily through the virtues of the philosopher’s soul (McKoy, 2008).

What did Socrates and Polus agree on?

Socrates and Polus both agree that punishment serves to bring those guilty of wrong to justice, by balancing against the wrong which already has been committed. Socrates also points out that one who receives punishment for a wrong “suffers justly” by paying the just penalty.

Who does Socrates claim is the happiest?

580b). In this first of the “proofs,” Socrates argues that the most just are the happiest. The “turmoil” (ταραχή) that occurs in the soul when reason is prevented from engaging in its proper activity outweighs any of the things traditionally thought to contribute to a good life.

Is gorgia speech persuasive?

He asks him what rhetoric produces, and Gorgias replies that it is persuasion. He claims that rhetoric enables a man to persuade judges, members of the assembly, and others that deal with governmental issues. He also boasts that a rhetorician can have anyone he wants as his slave by using his powers of persuasion.

Which of the following according to Socrates is the most miserable fellow?

Why does Socrates insist that the tyrant is the most miserable man? because he is afraid of everyone because they might steal his power and is a prisoner to his own passions.

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Why did Plato banished poetry?

Plato is famous for having banished poetry and poets from the ideal city of the Republic. He banished them because they produced the wrong sort of poetry. To rebut Plato’s critique of poetry, what is needed is not a defence of poetry, but a defence of the freedom of poets to write as, and what, they wish.

What is the contribution of Plato in communication?

Plato preferred to write in a dialogical form. In fact, he believed that oral communication is superior to written text (1). He believed that writing in the form of dialogues was useful for transmitting principles to people, with the aim of spreading the concepts of his doctrine in the most congenial way.

What does Socrates say about poetry?

According to Socrates, this imitative poetry feeds the irrational desires that go against the best part in our soul. Poetic imitation gives the necessary ground for irrational desires to rule the soul, which he believes is the greatest accusation against poetry (606d).

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