Quick Answer: What Causes Public Speaking Anxiety?

Although public speaking is one of the most commonly feared situations by the general population, not everyone fears it for the same reason. The main causes of CA can be fear of failure, the audience, high stakes, and being the center of attention.
A common fear in public speaking is the brain freeze. The prospect of having an audience’s attention while standing in silence feels like judgment and rejection. The pre-frontal lobes of our brain sort our memories and is sensitive to anxiety.

Why do I get anxiety when public speaking?

Here’s the bad news: Our brains have transferred that ancient fear of being watched onto public speaking. In other words, public-speaking anxiety is in our DNA. We experience public speaking as an attack. We physiologically register an audience as a threatening predator and mount a comparable response.

How do you overcome public speaking anxiety?

These steps may help:

  1. Know your topic.
  2. Get organized.
  3. Practice, and then practice some more.
  4. Challenge specific worries.
  5. Visualize your success.
  6. Do some deep breathing.
  7. Focus on your material, not on your audience.
  8. Don’t fear a moment of silence.
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What are the 4 phases of speech anxiety symptoms?

McCroskey argues there are four types of communication apprehension: anxiety related to trait, context, audience, and situation (McCroskey, 2001). If you understand these different types of apprehension, you can gain insight into the varied communication factors that contribute to speaking anxiety.

What are signs of speech anxiety?

Speech anxiety can range from a slight feeling of “nerves” to a nearly incapacitating fear. Some of the most common symptoms of speech anxiety are: shaking, sweating, butterflies in the stomach, dry mouth, rapid heartbeat, and squeaky voice.

How common is fear of public speaking?

Glossophobia, or the fear of public speaking, is remarkably common. In fact, some experts estimate that as much as 77% of the population has some level of anxiety regarding public speaking. 1 Of course, many people are able to manage and control the fear.

How do I overcome fear and anxiety?

Tips to Work Through Your Fear and Live Your Life

  1. Allow yourself to sit with your fear for 2-3 minutes at a time.
  2. Write down the things you are grateful for.
  3. Remind yourself that your anxiety is a storehouse of wisdom.
  4. Exercise.
  5. Use humor to deflate your worst fears.
  6. Appreciate your courage.

How do I cope with anxiety?

Try these when you’re feeling anxious or stressed:

  1. Take a time-out.
  2. Eat well-balanced meals.
  3. Limit alcohol and caffeine, which can aggravate anxiety and trigger panic attacks.
  4. Get enough sleep.
  5. Exercise daily to help you feel good and maintain your health.
  6. Take deep breaths.
  7. Count to 10 slowly.
  8. Do your best.
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What are the stages of communication speech anxiety?

McCroskey argues there are four types of communication apprehension: anxiety related to trait, context, audience, and situation. If you understand these different types of apprehension, you can gain insight into the varied communication factors that contribute to speaking anxiety.

Why do meetings give me anxiety?

Truth is, many of us feel some level of social anxiety anticipating a work meeting and don’t know how to overcome it. The pressure to speak up in meetings, meet new people, and validate yourself in front of a group can easily cause anxiety and get particularly overwhelming for some.

What is a Glossophobia?

What is glossophobia? Glossophobia isn’t a dangerous disease or chronic condition. It’s the medical term for the fear of public speaking. And it affects as many as four out of 10 Americans. For those affected, speaking in front of a group can trigger feelings of discomfort and anxiety.

What are the physical symptoms of fear of public speaking?

Symptoms of Glossophobia Dry mouth. A stiffening of the upper back muscles. Nausea and a feeling of panic when faced with having to speak in public. Intense anxiety at the thought of speaking in front of a group.

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